Measuring the economic successes of low carbon and renewable policies in Scotland

Grant Allan, Department of Economics and Deputy Director Fraser of Allander Institute, University of Strathclyde


It was central to 2010’s “Low carbon economic strategy for Scotland” that there could be economic opportunities in decarbonising the Scottish economy: “jobs in the low carbon sector in Scotland could… rise to 130,000, over 5% of the Scottish workforce”. The slightly later “2020 Routemap for Renewable Energy in Scotland” justified ambitious energy targets – for instance, the equivalent of 100% of Scottish electricity demand to be produced from renewables in Scotland – as “necessary to reindustrialise Scotland through 21st century technologies and seize the opportunities to create tens of thousands of new jobs and secure billions of pounds of investment in our economy”. Five years later, it is an opportune time to reflect on what we can conclude about the economic successes of low carbon and renewable energy policy in Scotland.

So are we on track to secure a jobs revolution? Continue reading “Measuring the economic successes of low carbon and renewable policies in Scotland”

How might Brexit affect the supply of energy in Scotland?


Grant Allan, Department of Economics and Fraser of Allander Institute


The Scotland energy system is currently in the process of an unprecedented restructuring. The implications of the UK’s Brexit vote for these changes over both the short and long term are critical to the future shape of Scotland’s energy mix.

This matters for three reasons: first, energy policies have implications for the price of energy faced by households and firms; second, the Scottish government have identified the “transition to a low carbon economy” as an area which can deliver economic (as well as environmental) benefits in the short and medium term; third, Scotland has environmental (domestically-set) targets, paramount to which is reducing the carbon intensity of energy production and use.
Continue reading “How might Brexit affect the supply of energy in Scotland?”